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Ice Bath or Whole-Body Cryotherapy?

Human beings are endothermic or “warm blooded,” which means we maintain our body temperature with internal heat sources. But maintaining your body temperature is not always a comfortable process, as athletes who take ice baths for muscle recovery will tell you. Wikipedia quotes champion weightlifter Karyn Marshall, who took an ice bath after the 2011 Read more…


Whole-Body Cryotherapy for Cellulite

To understand cellulite, you need to understand your skin has three layers. The outermost is the epidermis, which is the part we usually think of when we think of skin. It’s the thinnest and the most disposable layer of skin. In fact, it is continually being sloughed off and renewed. Directly under the epidermis is Read more…


Cryotherapy for Cancer

There are three ways — all preventive — in which whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) may help to reduce the risk of cancer. 1. Weight Management According to the National Cancer Institute, higher body fat is associated with at least 13 kinds of cancer, several of which (breast, liver, ovarian, pancreatic, colorectal) are among the best known Read more…


Cryotherapy for Arthritis: A Management Strategy

According to Arthritis By The Numbers (PDF), published by the Arthritis Foundation, about 54.4 million adults officially have arthritis. I say “officially,” because they have been diagnosed by doctors. When you add in people who report the symptoms of arthritis but haven’t been diagnosed, however, the total comes to 91 million. Furthermore, the incidence of Read more…


Whole-Body Cryotherapy for Back Pain

Colin Cook Back pain comes in many varieties, but the most pervasive one is probably low back pain. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke publishes a Low Back Pain Fact Sheet that makes for rather bleak reading: “About 80 percent of adults experience low back pain at some point in their lifetimes. It Read more…


Cryotherapy for Arthritis

Colin Cook According to Wikipedia, more than 20% of Americans have arthritis. But that statement makes the situation sound much simpler than it is. “Arthritis” refers to inflammation of the joints, and there are at least 100 kinds: “The most common forms are osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease) and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis usually occurs with age Read more…


Whole-Body Cryotherapy for Multiple Sclerosis

Colin Cook Multiple sclerosis — MS for short — is a disease of the central nervous system. It can result in double vision, blindness in one eye, muscle weakness, problems with coordination, slurred speech, tremors, numbness or tingling, fatigue, dizziness, or problems with bowel or bladder function. The symptoms are highly variable, and they can Read more…


How Whole-Body Cryotherapy (WBC) Works

Colin Cook I have written about whole-body cryotherapy’s usefulness for depression, muscle soreness, fibromyalgia, inflammation, Alzheimer’s, dermatitis, a weakened immune system, tinnitus, and oxidative stress. But what actually happens to a person in a cabinet when the temperature is lowered to minus 200 degrees? I want to use this post to explain the physiology of WBC. Read more…


The FDA vs. Whole-Body Cryotherapy (WBC)

I recently completed an Ironman competition in Louisville with more than satisfactory results, capping off a hectic six months under constant threat of interference with my training. But in those six months, I exercised as much discipline as I could and became almost fanatical about recovery. Judicious use of the different services here at Peak Read more…


Can Cryotherapy Treat Tinnitus?

According to the Latin Dictionary, the noun tinnītǔs means “ringing, clanging, jangling.” In English, tinnitus names a condition colloquially known as “ringing in the ears.” To those that suffer from it, it may not be actual ringing. It can also sound like clicking, hissing, or roaring. Some tinnitus sufferers hear indistinct voices or music. The Read more…