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Cryotherapy for Muscle Soreness

Cryotherapy for muscle soreness is well established. Both research literature and practical accounts are abundant. I don’t need to go over all the studies here. But I thought it might be a good idea to discuss the myth that soreness is something you should avoid. There’s a television commercial for Advil that shows people doing Read more…


Cryotherapy for Migraine

Cryotherapy for migraine. Sound far-fetched? Actually, it’s not. Our experience here at Peak Recovery & Health Center may help. But first let’s get some background. According to the Migraine Research Foundation, more than 39 million people (men, women, and even children) suffer from migraine in the U.S. More than 90% of those are incapacitated during Read more…



Ice Bath or Whole-Body Cryotherapy?

Human beings are endothermic or “warm blooded,” which means we maintain our body temperature with internal heat sources. But maintaining your body temperature is not always a comfortable process, as athletes who take ice baths for muscle recovery will tell you. Wikipedia quotes champion weightlifter Karyn Marshall, who took an ice bath after the 2011 Read more…


Whole-Body Cryotherapy for Cellulite

To understand cellulite, you need to understand your skin has three layers. The outermost is the epidermis, which is the part we usually think of when we think of skin. It’s the thinnest and the most disposable layer of skin. In fact, it is continually being sloughed off and renewed. Directly under the epidermis is Read more…


Cryotherapy for Cancer

There are three ways — all preventive — in which whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) may help to reduce the risk of cancer. 1. Weight Management According to the National Cancer Institute, higher body fat is associated with at least 13 kinds of cancer, several of which (breast, liver, ovarian, pancreatic, colorectal) are among the best known Read more…


Cryotherapy for Arthritis: A Management Strategy

According to Arthritis By The Numbers (PDF), published by the Arthritis Foundation, about 54.4 million adults officially have arthritis. I say “officially,” because they have been diagnosed by doctors. When you add in people who report the symptoms of arthritis but haven’t been diagnosed, however, the total comes to 91 million. Furthermore, the incidence of Read more…


Whole Body Cryotherapy for Brown Fat Activation

In order to understand whether whole-body cryotherapy can cause brown fat activation, it’s necessary first to look at fat in general. In the human body, fat serves three vital functions. First, it is a critical source of fuel when your metabolism cannot find carbohydrates. Second, vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble, and fat Read more…


Cryotherapy for Arthritis

Colin Cook According to Wikipedia, more than 20% of Americans have arthritis. But that statement makes the situation sound much simpler than it is. “Arthritis” refers to inflammation of the joints, and there are at least 100 kinds: “The most common forms are osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease) and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis usually occurs with age Read more…


Whole-Body Cryotherapy for Multiple Sclerosis

Colin Cook Multiple sclerosis — MS for short — is a disease of the central nervous system. It can result in double vision, blindness in one eye, muscle weakness, problems with coordination, slurred speech, tremors, numbness or tingling, fatigue, dizziness, or problems with bowel or bladder function. The symptoms are highly variable, and they can Read more…